Investigating films produced outside Hollywood

  1. Paper 2: Exploring Film outside Hollywood (1 hour, 20%)
    Three compulsory questions on one film produced outside Hollywood, chosen from a list prescribed by the Awarding Body. Questions will be based on:

    •   characters, narratives, themes and issues in the film chosen
    •   the way people, places, events and issues are represented in the film and
    •   a creative question involving individual responses to the film (e.g. reviews, blogs, website entries).

      Areas of study

    • Candidates study one film produced outside Hollywood from a prescribed list in

      terms of:

      •   the characters and narrative of the film chosen
      •   the issues raised by the chosen film
      •   the representation of people, places, events and issues
      •   how film language contributes to those representations

Films available for study

The following choice of films, first examined in Summer 2013, will be available for examination until a new specification is introduced (date to be confirmed).

Amélie (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, France/Germany, 2001)
Bend It Like Beckham (Gurinder Chadha, UK/Germany/US, 2002) The Boy in Striped Pyjamas (Mark Herman, UK/USA, 2008)
The Devil’s Backbone (Guillermo del Toro, Mexico/Spain, 2001) Persepolis (Marjane Satrapi & Vincent Parronaud, France, 2007) Ratcatcher (Lynne Ramsay, UK/France, 1999)
Rabbit-Proof Fence (Phillip Noyce, Australia, 2002)
Tsotsi (Gavin Hood, South Africa/UK, 2005)
The Wave (Dennis Gansel, Germany, 2008)
Yasmin (Kenneth Glenaan, UK/Germany, 2004). 

 

Preparation for the Films Outside Hollywood Exam

Expectations

By the end of this unit it is expected that all students will: recognize the ways in which Films are Produced and brought to market outside Hollywood; and comment on their appeal to audiences; demonstrate an emerging sense of Film Language including micro-language by commenting on the ways in which people, places and themes are represented in the close-study film.

Most students will: recognize the ways in which Films are Produced and brought to market outside Hollywood and comment on the advantages and disadvantges of doing so; demonstrate an increasingly confident sense of Film Language including micro-language by commenting on the ways in which people, places and themes are represented in the close-study film and exploring the ways in which these elements create audience appeal.

Some learners will have progressed further and will: recognize the ways in which Films are Produced and brought to market outside Hollywood and comment on the advantages and disadvantges of doing so; demonstrate an assured sense of Film Language including micro-language by commenting on the ways in which people, places and themes are represented in the close-study film and exploring the ways in which these elements create audience appeal by evaluating the effects they achieve.

How to help your child

Watch the ‘film Outside Hollywood’ with your child.

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