Sticky note race

Please contact Catherine Wilson for further information about this technique 
 
This team game enables students to practise defining key words or answering key questions for a particular topic and requires quick recall skills.

Resources
Packet of sticky/Post It notes
Keywords for a topic and their definitions

Planning
Beforehand, create a list of key terms and their definitions – at least enough for one between two students. You could mix and match these with key questions and their answers.
Write each key term on the reverse of a sticky note, ‘upside-down’ – so that if you stick the sticky note down and lift it from the bottom to peer underneath, the word will appear upright.
Keep a list of the key terms/definitions you’ve used. Instructions
In the classroom, stick the sticky notes all over the whiteboard. Divide the class into two teams.

One student from each team should come and stand at the whiteboard. 
You read out the definition, and the students must race against each other to find the key term by simultaneously lifting up the sticky notes to peer underneath. The rest of the class should remain silent unless their player turns round to ask for help. Then they may call the answer to them (although this obviously aids both teams).
Once a student finds the correct answer they pull it off the board and you check it. If correct, they keep the sticky note for their team. If wrong, the other playing student should be asked for the answer and can have the point if they say the correct one. 
The whole class should then take it in turns to come up in pairs as above.
The winning team is the one at the end of the game with the most sticky notes.Variants

These could include:

– Incorporating other types of questions e.g. Maths – finding the correct formula, Music – finding rhythmic values, History – finding key dates.

– Reversing questions – e.g. write definitions on the sticky notes, and you then read out the key words.
– Targeting particular questions at certain students to check understanding.
– Using a student question master – who could have the extra challenge of defining the key word to be found ‘on the spot’.
– Asking students to devise their own questions/definitions/key words list in advance of the game.