Year 7 – Dramatic Approaches to Shakespeare

Please note: There will be changes to this scheme for 2015-2016.  Watch this space!

When?
Spring Term One -
The exact date of the assessment is dependent on the individual student’s timetable; however, this will be circa the week commencing Monday 9th February 2015.

What is the assessment task?
Students deliver a spoken word presentation on Shakespeare aimed at a group of exchange students. The presentation must include the analysis of a short extract from a Shakespeare play of the students’ choice (to be modelled by the teacher).

How will the task be assessed?
Assessment Foci: Speaking & Listening AF1 & 2.; Reading AF2, 6, & 7. Please click on the below for details of each assessment focus.

DRAMATIC APPROACHES TO SHAKESPEARE

What students can do to prepare:
Master key spellings and their meanings: Shakespeare, Culture, Elizabethan, Dramatic, Theatre, Comedy, Tragedy, Historical, Stage, Actor, Audience, Characterisation, Villain, Hero, Iambic Pentameter, Rhetoric, Monologue and Soliloquy.

Practise speaking in front of a mirror: Part of your assessment will involve speaking to the class in a group.  Have a go at writing a short speech about something that interests you and watch yourself as you deliver it in the mirror.  What do you think?  Do you speak too quickly?  A bit slowly?  Do you ‘er’ and ‘um’ a lot?  Can you hear yourself clearly?  Do you sound interesting?!  If you have access to an iPad, you could even record yourself and watch it back.  Remember: Even if you don’t FEEL confident, you can LOOK confident!

Seek out different versions of Shakespeare’s plays: There are some great graphic novels available in the school library and some fantastic Manga versions out there!  Also, don’t forget, Shakespeare wrote his plays to be performed so see if you can get your hands on some film or television adaptations (remembering to check their rating).  The BBC frequently make stage-to-film versions available on the BBC iPlayer:  David Tennant and Catherine Tate did a brilliant version of ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ at the National Theatre recently.

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