The English Reformation

To what extent was there an English Reformation?

Pupils will learn about the English Reformation through a systematic and chronological study of the Tudor monarchs from Henry VIII to the mid-Tudor crisis, finishing with Elizabeth I. By looking at these key monarchs’ religious preferences, pupils will improve their understanding and use of the second-order concept of change. The unit will include investigations into the pace and nature of change but it will focus on the extent of change. In completing this unit, pupils should also gain a good sense of period. Pupils will produce
a ‘change graph’ at the end of the unit to summarise what they have learnt but their formal assessment will come in the form of the ‘National Portrait Gallery Symbolic Image Homework’, which turns to the second-order concept of evidence.

Expectations

By the end of this unit it is expected that all students will: be able to identify some changes and/or continuities within the period by describing key events in the story of the English Reformation.

Most students will: be able to explain either the pace, nature or extent of changes and/or continuities within the English Reformation, using simple terminology.

Some learners will have progressed further and will: be able to fully evaluate the pace, nature and extent of changes and/or continuities within the English Reformation, using complex terminology, and begin to analyse progression over time.

Key Assessments

Pupils will produce a ‘change graph’ at the end of the unit to summarise what they have learnt but their formal assessment will come in the form of the ‘National Portrait Gallery Symbolic Image Homework’, which turns to the second-order concept of evidence. They will use what they have learnt about symbols in Tudor portraits to describe their own life and personality. They will consider the value of symbolism by explaining each symbol as well as the overall message of their portrait. Some will also evaluate the purpose and audience of their composition.

Extended homework tasks

Students will be asked to complete the ‘National Portrait Gallery Symbolic Image Homework’ over a period of three weeks. Students will be expected to draw on their knowledge from lessons and undertake independent research before sharing their work with others in the class.

How to help your child

Students and their parents can discuss why Henry VIII divorced Catherine of Aragon and why he dissolved the monasteries. Parents can help their children by encouraging them to see both sides of the debate so that they form more balanced arguments. They can also help by encouraging their children to use key words from the topic in their written and oral work.

Language for learning

Heretic   Anticlericalism   Nationalism   Pope   Catholicism   Protestantism   Lutheranism   Transubstantiation   Consubstantiation   Reformation   Divorce   Marriage   Pilgrimage   Iconoclasm   Dissolution   Monastery   Alliance   Martyr   Propaganda   Crisis   Change   Continuity   Pace   Nature   Extent   Progress   Political   Social   Religious   Economic  Evidence   Value   Symbol   Message   Purpose   Audience   Portrait

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